Monday, May 18, 2015

Ireland Day 6~Limerick


There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, 'It is just as I feared!
Two Owls and a Hen,
Four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard!'

I used to love to teach Limericks to my third and fourth grade students and so it was wonderful to actually travel to Limerick, Ireland on our 6th day.
 As we moved on toward Limerick    I loved the    sights along the way... such a magnificent  country
 if you like masonry and  stonework  you'll love Ireland!


 loved the neighborhoods.. so differnt  freom ours   but   lovely
 and excuse the glare,  but  we are  approaching  the River Shannon and on the right here is   the  walled    tower of  King John's castle!
 We are  cross the River Shannon, Ireland's longest river.




And we are on the other side looking back before us is the Treaty Stone, The river and King John's Castle in the background....

During the civil wars of the 17th century the city played a pivotal role, besieged by Oliver Cromwell in 1651 and twice by the Williamites in the 1690s. The The Treaty of Limerick ended the williamite war in ireland, which was fought between supporters of the Catholic King James II (Jacobites) and the Protestant King William of orange (Williamites). The treaty offered toleration to Catholicism and full legal rights to Catholics that swore an oath of loyalty to William and Mary. The Treaty was of national significance as it ensured closer British and Protestant dominance over Ireland. The articles of the Treaty protecting Catholic rights were not passed by the Protestant Irish parliament  but rather updated the penal laws  against Catholics which had major implications for Irish history. Reputedly the Treaty was signed on the Treaty Stone, an irregular block of limestone which once served as a mounting block for horses. This stone is now displayed on a pedestal at Clancy Strand. Because of the treaty, Limerick is sometimes known as the Treaty City. This turbulent period earned the city its motto: Urbs antiqua fuit studisque asperrima belli (An ancient city well studied in the arts of war).


Luimneach originally referred to the general area along the banks of the Shannon estuary known as Loch Luimnigh. The earliest settlement in the city,Inis Sibhtonn, was the original name for King's Island during the pre-Viking and Viking eras. This island was also called Inis an Ghaill Duibh, The Dark(haired) Foreigner's Island. The name is recorded in Viking sources as Hlymrekr.


The city dates from 812 which is the earliest provable settlement ; however, history suggests the presence of earlier settlements in the area surrounding King's Island, the island at the historical city centre. Antiquity's map-maker, Ptolemy, produced in 150 the earliest map of Ireland, showing a place called "Regia" at the same site as King's Island. History also records an important battle involving Cormac mac Airt in 221 and a visit by St. Patrick in 434 to baptise an EĆ³ganachta king, Carthann the Fair. Saint Munchin, the first bishop of Limerick died in 652, indicating the city was a place of some note. In 812 the Vikings sailed up the Shannon and pillaged the city, burned the monastery of Mungret but were forced to flee when the Irish attacked and killed many of their number. The Normans redesigned the city in the 12th century and added much of the most notable architecture, such as King John's Castle



and St. Mary's Cathedral

In early medieval times Limerick was at the centre of the Kingdom of Thomond which corresponds to the present day Mid West Region however, the Kingdom also included North Kerry and parts of South Offaly. One of the kingdom's most notable kings was Brian Boru, 


Brian first made himself King of Munster, then subjugated Leinster, eventually becoming King of Ireland. He is the founder of the O'Brien Dynasty.


Image result for Brian Boru


 LImerick is  certaoinly a   city where ancient meets modern!



 Loved this  sign



 and then we were   at our  home  for the evening....   loved it!  
  AW Air conditioning and   true  comfort!



We had about 30 minutes to rest and get ready for the evenings festivities!

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